Building brighter futures with achieve

Introduction

In these uncertain times, young people studying in schools and colleges across the UK are under extraordinary pressure to get good grades so they can stand out from the pack when it comes to getting a job.

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While the focus on grades and qualifications is as present as ever, the opportunity to develop life and character skills beyond the core curriculum is increasingly recognised as being vital to helping young people thrive when they enter the world of work.

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That’s why The Prince’s Trust has released a report, supported by HSBC, which lifts the lid on current attitudes to soft skills. Are young people developing all the abilities they need to succeed as they gear up for working life?

Research

We asked thousands of young people, teachers and employees from across the country to tell us about their experiences of developing soft skills – such as teamwork, communication and resilience – as well as share their thoughts on the impact these skills could make to a young person’s self-confidence and future prospects.

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Soft skills are considered by young people, teachers and employees to be as important to achieving success in life as good grades.

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43% of young people don’t feel prepared to enter the workforce, with many worried they lack the confidence and skills to succeed.

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More than a quarter of teachers (27%) think that most of their students don’t yet have all the soft skills required to do well after school.

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72% of employees felt they themselves didn’t have the soft skills to do well when they first started working.

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64% of employees felt a lack of soft skills meant they struggled to find a job when they were starting out.

Around The UK

Find out what's happening in your area

Our map shows just a few of the areas where we run the Achieve programme, which offers a practical approach to learning to help young people fulfil their potential. For more details of where it runs in your area, or if you’d like to start your own, contact us to find out more.

Key

(click category to filter markers)

Scotland

Scotland is one of Achieve’s largest delivery areas, with programmes running in Edinburgh, Glasgow and plenty more in-between.

Find out how a battalion of young soldiers who died a century ago inspired a group of young people to do something in their community to honour their memory.

Northern Ireland

Achieve’s personal development course provides support for 11 to 19-year-olds across Northern Ireland.

London

Having experienced a turbulent home life, Sarah Klauber’s stress and depression meant she began to suffer from alopecia.

Impacting her school life, her attendance dropped to just 40%, until the Achieve programme gave her a second chance.

Liverpool

Struggling with a complex blood disorder, Callum Clements was disruptive at school. He lacked confidence and felt isolated so his adopted mother contacted The Prince’s Trust.

Taking part in Achieve, he learnt how to manage his emotions and developed team-building skills.

Leicestershire

Achieve programmes are a lifeline for young people like Baseer Khan-Omarkhil, originally from Afghanistan, who arrived in England with little education and, as a result, struggled at school.

Swansea

Achieve programmes take place in Swansea, Neath and Port Talbot to name a few helping young people like Alfie Walters, who regained his confidence at school after a history of low attainment and motivation.

Sheffield

When young people are excluded from school, the mountains they have to climb to get back on track are significantly high.

Connor Burgess was sent to a new school but his attitude was so negative he risked being excluded all over again – until he was introduced to Achieve.

Southampton

The Achieve programme helps 11 to 19-year-olds in Southampton, and other areas across Hampshire, prepare for work by developing their CVs while exploring their skills and talent.

London

57% of teachers in London believe that all or most of disadvantaged young people are being left behind at school.

But, 96% believe that supporting students to develop soft skills can improve their academic performance.

East Midlands

37% of teachers in the East Midlands believe that all or most of disadvantaged young people are being left behind at school.

But, 88% believe that supporting students to develop soft skills can improve their academic performance.

Northern Ireland

41% of teachers in the Northern Ireland believe that all or most of disadvantaged young people are being left behind at school.

But, 82% believe that supporting students to develop soft skills can improve their academic performance.

South West

39% of teachers in the South West believe that all or most of disadvantaged young people are being left behind at school.

But, 96% believe that supporting students to develop soft skills can improve their academic performance.

Wales

33% of teachers in Wales believe that all or most of disadvantaged young people are being left behind at school.

But, 89% believe that supporting students to develop soft skills can improve their academic performance.

Yorkshire & Humber

44% of teachers in Yorkshire and the Humber believe that all or most of disadvantaged young people are being left behind at school.

But, 93% believe that supporting students to develop soft skills can improve their academic performance.

Scotland

41% of teachers in Scotland believe that all or most of disadvantaged young people are being left behind at school.

But, 92% believe that supporting students to develop soft skills can improve their academic performance.

East of England

33% of employees in the East of England felt very or somewhat unprepared for their first job.

What's more, 60% felt they themselves didn’t have all the soft skills to do well when they first started working.

London

24% of employees in London felt very or somewhat unprepared for their first job.

What's more, 70% felt they themselves didn’t have all the soft skills to do well when they first started working.

West Midlands

33% of employees in the West Midlands felt very or somewhat unprepared for their first job.

What's more, 69% felt they themselves didn’t have all the soft skills to do well when they first started working.

North East

29% of employees in the North East felt very or somewhat unprepared for their first job.

What's more, 68% felt they themselves didn’t have all the soft skills to do well when they first started working.

Scotland

40% of employees in Scotland felt very or somewhat unprepared for their first job.

What's more, 60% felt they themselves didn’t have all the soft skills to do well when they first started working.

Wales

26% of employees in Wales felt very or somewhat unprepared for their first job.

What’s more, 58% felt they themselves didn’t have all the soft skills to do well when they first started working.

Northern Ireland

30% of employees in Northern Ireland felt very or somewhat unprepared for their first job.

What’s more, 70% felt they themselves didn’t have all the soft skills to do well when they first started working.

South West

35% of employees in the South West felt very or somewhat unprepared for their first job.

What’s more, 58% felt they themselves didn’t have all the soft skills to do well when they first started working.

London

17% of young people in London feel somewhat or very unprepared to enter the workforce.

What's more, 20% of those who feel this way believe their soft skills are not good enough.

West Midlands

16% of young people in the West Midlands feel somewhat or very unprepared to enter the workforce.

What's more, 33% of those who feel this way believe their soft skills are not good enough.

Northern Ireland

19% of young people in Northern Ireland feel somewhat or very unprepared to enter the workforce.

What's more, 56% of those who feel this way believe their soft skills are not good enough.

Scotland

21% of young people in Scotland feel somewhat or very unprepared to enter the workforce.

What's more, 44% of those who feel this way believe their soft skills are not good enough.

South West

30% of young people in the South West feel somewhat or very unprepared to enter the workforce.

What's more, 36% of those who feel this way believe their soft skills are not good enough.

Wales

14% of young people in Wales feel somewhat or very unprepared to enter the workforce.

What's more, 38% of those who feel this way believe their soft skills are not good enough.

North East

25% of young people in the North East feel somewhat or very unprepared to enter the workforce.

What's more, 62% of those who feel this way believe their soft skills are not good enough.

Find Out More

At The Prince’s Trust we're committed to working in partnership with schools and alternative education providers to help pupils achieve their full potential at a crucial phase in their development.

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Our Achieve programme complements existing learning in the formal education setting, supporting 11 to 19-year-olds who are at risk of underachieving to develop soft skills, engage with education and, ultimately, to unlock their potential.

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Working in over 500 schools, youth centres, pupil referral units and young offender institutes across the country, we give up to 12,000 young people each year the space and attention they need to build their confidence and develop their abilities. We also inspire young people early on in their education, before problems arise, through our mentoring programmes in schools.

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Over 90% of the young people we work with on Achieve, of which HSBC is the largest corporate supporter, move into a positive outcome and 86% would recommend it to a friend. But don’t just take our word for it. Be inspired by the success stories on our website or by clicking ‘find out more’ below.

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